Dakota Badlands

The North Dakota badlands are found in the western portion of the state.  The badlands were laid down 65 million years ago during the Paleocene Epoch.  Petrified sequoia stumps can be found in the badlands a result of the ancient swamp which was later covered with volcanic ash.  Bison, elk, coyote, prairie dogs and beautiful birds are now found in the badlands.


"The Bad Lands grade all the way from those that are almost rolling in character to those that are so fantastically broken in form and so bizarre in color as to seem hardly properly to belong to this earth."  "I grow very fond of this place, and it certainly has a desolate, grim beauty of its own, that has a curious fascination for me."  Theodore Roosevelt, 26th President of the United States of America 1901-1909, rancher in North Dakota Badlands 1883-1887


The North Dakota Badlands



American Bison



Dust to Dust

American Bison



Pronghorn



Western Meadowlark



Mule Deer



Wild Horse



Sharp-tailed Grouse



Mountain Bluebird



Mule Deer


Theodore Roosevelt National Park contains 70,000 acres in three units: the South Unit has 46,158 acres of which 10,510 are designated wilderness; the North Unit has 24,070 acres of which 19,410 are designated wilderness and the Elkhorn Ranch has 218 acres.  The Elkhorn Ranch was the site of Theodore Roosevelt's second ranch in the badlands.  The park has excellent wildlife viewing opportunities.



Coyote



Coyote



Coyote



American Badger



American Badger



American Badger


Coyote at Sunrise



Coyote



Coyote



American Badger



American Badger



American Badger

Most of the North Dakota badlands were created  from erosion by the Little Missouri River.  The exposed sediments were deposited during the  Paleocene age.  These sediments of sandstone, claystone and lignite coal were deposited by rivers flowing east to the Dakotas from the Rocky Mountains in Montana and Wyoming.  Some layers are from volcanic ash.



Little Missouri River



American Bison


Nursing

American Bison



Autumn Colors



Mountain Bluebird



Sunset North Dakota Badlands



American Bison


Bison Rubbing on Butte

American Bison



Sunset



Mountain Bluebird

The mountain bird's summer range extends from western North Dakota to Canada and Alaska. During the winter, the travel to southern central states and Central America. They hover while looking for insects.



Black-billed Magpie



Fox Squirrel



Black-tailed Prairie Dog



Black-tailed Prairie Dog



Feral Horse



Feral Horse



Loggerhead Shrike



Least Chipmunk



Black-tailed Prairie Dog



Black-tailed Prairie Dog



Feral Horse



Mule Deer

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